What is a Nautilus?

13 Nautilus Road  |  Great Island  |  Narragansett

From Greek, meaning “sailor”, the nautilus is a living marine mollusk found in the Pacific Ocean. Its spiral shell is beautiful and noted for its many chambers. The nautilus has not changed in 500 million years and is called a “living fossil”.

www.13Nautilus.com

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Best Places to Live in Rhode Island

Niche has announced the best places to live in Rhode Island and our favorites are on the list.

https://www.niche.com/places-to-live/?state=RI&sort=best

Here’s how they calculated the top towns https://www.niche.com/places-to-live/rankings/places/best-places-to-live/methodology/

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Do This One Thing

There is a right way and a wrong way to paint:

Some would say the right way to paint is to hire professionals.

If this isn’t an option then do this one thing before you start to paint:

Prep, Prep and Prep

It’s all about the preparation and planning: Clean the surfaces completely. Don’t just dust but scrub clean and let dry for 24 hours. Tape areas not to be painted. Buy the right brushes and rollers for the job. Prime first. Remove furniture, area rugs and drapes. Use cloth, not plastic drop clothes. Fix blemishes both big (holes) and small (scratches). Remove outlet covers (then clean or purchase new ones). Test a couple of small areas to make sure the paint color is what you want in different lights at different times of day.

Part of the planning process is learning: What’s the difference between matte and gloss finishes? What is “cutting in“?  “What kind of paint brush is best and how should the brush be loaded? Why is priming important? What is “laying off“? How does humidity affect the painting process? What is the “W” technique? Talk to your paint supplier whether your hometown hardware store or a big box retailer – ask questions, get tips all before you dip the brush into the paint.

 

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7 Timeless Kitchen Features

009-175981-22_3498224This is a gorgeous kitchen. It has 6 of the so called 7 timeless kitchen features:

Great light

A place to sit

A big sink

Lots of storage010-175981-23_3498226

Space to work

Tiled back splash

011-175981-24_3498228That # 7 feature that all great kitchens should have? The industry trend is checkered floors. Instead, I prefer Beautiful Floors.

 

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5 Home Upgrades That Make You Feel Like A Movie Star

Sandy Bliven’s March 10, 2015 Newsletter

5 Home Upgrades That Make You Feel Like A Movie Star

 

Hollywood interior designer James Blakeley has the inside track when it comes to movie stars. Growing up in a four-generation film family that includes Oscar and Emmy winners, he specializes in creating home interiors with the luxurious comforts that movie stars crave. His design clients include Kiefer Sutherland, Tom Selleck, David Giler, Donald P. Bellisario and Dino De Laurentiis.

You, too, can have a star-worthy home, by following Blakeley’s five strategies for upgrades that make you feel like a movie star:

1. Pamper yourself with opulent bathrooms.

Hollywood stars lead hectic, scattered lives. “They’re pushed all day long and when they’re making a movie, they might work 18 or 20-hour days,” Blakeley confides.

When they come home, they want creature comforts including a spa-like bathroom where they can zone out. You can get that feeling by installing heated floors, a big tub and a shower with multiple jets.

2. Oversize furniture makes for a relaxing environment.

Stars like oversize furniture because they’re all about relaxing and putting your feet up. “Instead of having a club chair that would be 32” x 32” they want things that are 42” x 42” or a sofa that’s 46” deep that you can get in and curl up,” Blakeley says. “It goes back to creature comforts. They want to sit in a big chair, push a button and watch a big TV.”

3. Trust your designer to get a good deal on furniture, fixtures and decorative items.

Give your designer your budget and then don’t worry about how much any one item costs, Blakeley says.

You might think you can find a good deal on the Internet, but your designer is going directly to the manufacturer and will usually get it for less, he says. “I’m going to mark it up 20 percent above cost, but I guarantee that 20 percent is still going to be less you can find it for on the Internet,” he says.

4. Splurge on fresh flowers.

Stars do like flowers in the house all the time, it’s part of their desire to totally relax when they’re home.

“They have people putting flowers out every single day even when they’re not there – in case they decide to come home,” Blakeley says. “Everyone can afford flowing houseplants or flowers for $6.95 from the farmers market. What it does is amazing to your psyche.”

5. Invest in a big screen television and a top-notch sound system.

Since they’re in the industry, stars want a big television with surround sound and music throughout the house.

Blakeley likes Sonos products. “Most clients don’t want to see the speakers,” he says. “We have them buried in the wall and cover them with a membrane that’s like drywall and paintable so it blends into the wall. “

Looking to spice up your home décor? Contact me and I’ll put you in touch with a talented local designer.

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Easy Curb Appeal when your home is for sale

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Listing your Home for Sale

Once you have made the decision to sell your home, you must prepare to list it on the market for sale.

Listing your home for sale involves a number of steps, but before you even begin the process of cleaning and repairing your home to sell, you should develop a detailed home selling plan. Think about the reasons why you are selling your home. Consider when and why you will need to sell your home because these factors play a role in determining your listing price. Also, the market has a significant impact on both the length of time it takes to sell a home as well as the selling price, so it is a good idea to plan ahead when listing your home. Even though a seller cannot control the market, there are other facets of the selling process that can be controlled.

Other than those who are highly experienced with the process of listing real estate, most home owners turn to a listing agent to sell their homes as quickly as possible. This is because qualified real estate agents are well-practiced in employing strong marketing tactics for their clients. One of the most important influential factors for selling a home is the listing’s level of exposure. It should be well-advertised and visible to potential buyers.  I specialize in listing homes for sale and am able to streamline the entire process while increasing your chances of closing a deal on your home.

Agents use MLS to help sell your home. A Multiple Listing Service is essentially a database that listing agents use to effectively gather information regarding homes for sale. As soon as your home is entered into the MLS system, thousands of potential buyers’ agents will immediately have access to the listing, which will include important data regarding your home.

When listing your home for sale with , we will utilize a Multiple Listing Service in addition to a variety of other advertising mediums such as home listing magazines, internet listings, websites and local newspaper advertisement.

Give your home the best chance of selling in a reasonable time frame and at a price that you will be satisfied with by making a plan and relying on the help of an experienced listing agent.

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Moving to New Home made easy

Moving to a new home can be a stressful yet exciting task. Moving requires careful planning and attention to detail — from improving or staging your home to help it sell, to packing up all of your stuff, and finding your new place. Make the process of planning your next move easier for the entire family using our Resources. We have an array of professionals that you can use to make selling your home, Packing, and moving easier than ever.  From staging professionals to moving companies we have developed a great relationship with these qualified individuals. See a sample list below or visit our full resource page.   And of course you can find homes for sale in your new community with our property search tool on the home page.

Architect

Laura D. Krekorian (my beautiful, talented wife) – 401.789.0039

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning

Clean Rite – 401.788.0932

Electrician

John McLaughlin- 401.265.3805

Home Inspectors

Home-Rite Home Inspections Ed Gardner 401.783.1655

Hearthstone Home Inspections Frank Hopton 401.635.2242

AmeriSpec Home Inspections Tom Watson 401.232.5445

Priority Building & Home Inspection Ernie Silvio 401.294.4994 www.priorityhomeinspection.com

Home Loans

Residential Mortgage Bill Huggins 401.574.0999

Maverick Funding   Jeffrey Kosiorek – 401.692.1108

 Staging

Inside Style,  Lee Chartier  401-783-7800  www.insidestyleri.com ,  insidestyleri@gmail.com

Moving Company

Astro of New England Chuck Lamendola 401.397.8484

Painter

Aaron Smith Enterprises – 401.932.8833

Plumber

Coastal Plumbing – 401.788.0355

Legal Services

Baruti Law Offices Daniel Baruti 401.789.5100 www.bsbv.com

John V. McCloskey – 401.783.9333

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10 Tips for Real Estate Buyers/Sellers 2014

1. Sellers: Jump-start the process

You may be an avowed procrastinator, but if you want to sell a house this year, start planning now. The process, say sellers, always takes longer than expected. So get your home inspected now; there may be unseen major repairs to address. Declutter, clean closets and shelves, store extraneous possessions and furnishings and other stuff that might keep sellers from picturing themselves in your space. Attend an open house or two to get an idea of how to stage yours. And move along: Owners still waiting for the market to peak should beware that this real estate cycle may be shorter-lived than last.

2. Buyers: Be credit-ready

There’s a lot of competition out there for homes, so tarry not. Get your credit report and start repairing any blips. If your scores are below 620 or so, a conventional loan will be a challenge. But if they’re under 740, you still might not get the best rates. Many buyers get a prequalification letter from the lender, but you can one-up them with a preapproval, which comes after a more thorough evaluation of your finances. A preapproval letter shows the seller that you’re good to go and can close quickly.

3. Sellers: Vet your real estate agent, then follow the agent’s advice

Sellers lose time and money by hiring poorly. Interview several potential agents. You’ll want a full-timer who is Web savvy and uses mobile technology, because at least 4 in 5 buyers view their homes first online. Your agent should be a proven performer in your submarket and be willing to walk you through the financial aspects of your deal. The more the agent knows about schools, commutes and other local details, the better. Once vetted, accept your agent’s advice on pricing, marketing and negotiation

4. Buyers: Adjust your negotiating expectations.

Lowball offers are off the table in this environment and could eliminate you from consideration. Respond to counteroffers quickly to keep other buyers from entering the picture; you don’t want to encourage a bidding war. If one breaks out, be prepared to get fewer concessions and pay more money. And have a few other homes in mind so you can be willing to walk away if the price soars.

5. Sellers: It’s your market (finally) so make the most of it.

At long last, it’s a seller’s market! While you’re interviewing agents, be wary of those offering too-good-to-be-true price opinions because they may be trying to “buy” your listing. And don’t jump at that first (seemingly) generous offer, especially if sellers are getting multiple offers. If you’re getting your price and then some, give something back to the buyer in good faith, such as an early move-in date or some personal property you’re not attached to. Never let the buyers’ agents know what you’re willing to do, though. Make them ask

6. Buyers: Find life after foreclosure.

Have a foreclosure in recent years? Join the crowd. Though you might think you have to wait seven years to get another conventional mortgage, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Federal Housing Administration say they actually require just a three-year waiting period if the foreclosure was caused by extenuating circumstances. There are plenty of nonconforming lenders — often called “shadow bankers” — out there if you can endure a big down payment (around 20 percent) and above-market interest rates. Or consider a lease-purchase or lease-option where you pay the homeowner a monthly premium above your rent for the right to buy at a set price later.

7. Sellers: Hesitate to renovate.

We hear that newly renovated homes are easier sells, and that’s true. So is it time to remodel that outmoded kitchen? Not if you plan to sell soon. According to remodeling surveys, the average renovation project returns only about two-thirds on investment. For example, a major bathroom remodel costing $15,000 yields about $10,000 in resale value. The same goes for a major kitchen remodel. In most cases, it would be cheaper to issue credits to buyers or drop your price a few grand. Lighter jobs like new doors are more practical and return about 85 percent. But feel free to spend a bit on paint (basic colors), curb appeal and fence replacement to enhance exteriors.

8. Buyers: Ask and you won’t receive (an unpleasant surprise).

You’d be dismayed at the things sellers aren’t obliged to disclose in most states, including on-premises felonies, suicide, murder or a neighboring sex offender. Don’t be afraid to thoroughly question the selling party in writing before signing the contract. Some questions: Is there a cell tower, water tower, natural gas well, oil well or other non-residential construction scheduled to be built in this neighborhood (then define “neighborhood”)? Is there commercial zoning on nearby vacant land? Is the yard prone to flooding? Are train whistles or other regular loud noises audible there? Did known criminal activity occur in the house? Have there been reported hauntings? Are there loud neighbors, dogs or other noise pollution? Are there registered sex offenders or other known criminals living nearby? If the selling party refuses to answer any of these questions, that’s a bright red flag.

9. Sellers: Tailor your local game.

Folks who base their selling decisions on trends on cable news are often left wondering, “Why can’t I sell at this price?” The truth is, all markets are different and all real estate is local, and prices can vary greatly even in adjacent subdivisions. Home prices are dictated largely by demand, land availability, foreclosures and employment. Most local real estate offices will provide market stats and at least a few recent comp sales in hopes of earning your business. Additional trend data can be found online or in local newspapers and business journals. A polite call or email to a local real estate appraiser might net more info or links to local statistics.

10. Sellers and buyers: Heed changing trends.

Pay attention to trends and react accordingly. Thinking of laying carpet? Agent surveys in the past few years show homes with hardwood floors or faux wood laminate floors are far faster sells. You still want to be in suburbia? Millennials don’t. Numerous cities — such as Austin, Texas; Portland, Ore.; and Minneapolis — have watched this more environmentally conscious generation flock to “mixed-use” urban districts served by trendy cafes, nightclubs, bike paths, civic events and mass transit. For now, they’re not buying condos, which haven’t recovered like the single-family market. They’re renting — but watching the condo market ever so carefully.

 

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